Construction of a Marsh

(click on any image to enlarge)

View of the Avon River before the bench was built ...

View of the Avon River before the bench was built …

Dirt fill was pushed out to construct bench ...

Dirt fill was pushed out to construct bench …

Erosion cloth and rip-rap was set to protect bench ...

Erosion cloth and rip-rap was set to protect bench …

View of Avon River after the bench was built ...

View of Avon River after the bench was built …

UTRCA staff laying out coir logs ...

UTRCA staff laying out coir logs …

An excavator was used to plant bulrushes ...

An excavator was used to plant bulrushes …

A view of the site in the summer of 2010 ...

A view of the site in the summer of 2010 …

Another view of the site in the summer of 2010 ...

Another view of the site in the summer of 2010 …

AREA’s major project has been the construction of a marsh on the south shore of the Avon River between the Festival Bridge and the Trestle Bridge at the east end of Lake Victoria.  The idea is that inflowing water will pass through the aquatic vegetation and pollutants will be filtered out. The construction involved the use of heavy equipment to build a dirt bench ranging in width from five to twenty five meters along one hundred meters of shoreline.  When the water of the lake is at regular height the bench will be a third of a meter below the surface.  The perimeter of the bench is protected by a layer of erosion fabric and large rip-rap, one half a meter to one meter in diameter.  Coir logs—rolls of coconut matting—were placed along the edge of the rip-rap to provide a protected area for the newly-planted bulrushes.  Although densification of bulrushes is needed at the east end of the marsh, the bulrushes at the west end are thriving and healthy.  This part of the project has been a success.

Excavation of Bulrushes from south Stratford ditches  July 2013

Excavation of Bulrushes from south Stratford ditches July 2013

Planting more Bulrushes July 2013

Planting more bulrushes July 2013

Planting Bulrushes towards Festival Bridge July 2013

Planting Bulrushes towards Festival Bridge July 2013

 

Bulrushes a year later (June 2014) have taken root

Cattails June 2014 #1

Bulrushes a year later (June 2014), we hope will thicken along the south shore towards the Festival Bridge.

BASKING LOGS

The purpose is to enhance natural habitat.  Birds can land on them, snapping
turtles could bask on them.  This is all a part of the mandate to
embrace nature, encourage wildlife and reduce pollution.

During the process temporary metal poles are stood up to keep the logs in place until ‘duckbill anchors’ can be installed.  The logs are actually hydro poles no longer used.  It is hoped to also utilize the Basking Logs as a ‘backstop’ for cattail planting as well.


Basking logs rolled into river 2014

Basking Logs – rolled into river from Festival Bridge in 2014


Basking Logs -  placement in 2014

Basking Logs – placement in 2014


Basking Logs -  squaring placement July 2014

Basking Logs – squaring placement July 2014




Basking logs awaiting bulrush planting

Basking logs awaiting bulrush planting


Basking logs view from river bank July 7, 2014

Basking Logs view from river bank July 7, 2014


Basking logs Sept 2014

Basking logs Sept 2014 – waterfowl relaxing


A plan showing Meadowrue Gardens, the Marsh (proposed underwater shoal) and the North Shore ...

A plan showing Meadowrue Gardens, the Marsh
(proposed underwater shoal) and the North Shore …

The second phase of the project is the construction of an underwater dirt bench two to three meters wide, along the north shore between the Festival Bridge and the Trestle Bridge.  This planting in conjunction with the Meadowrue natural area, the newly established marsh, and vegetation on the north bank, will provide a beautiful setting at the east end of the lake that will help clean the water and provide enjoyment for both wildlife and people.

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